openscience:

Earthworms that shit quantum technology!
“When things get small–like millionths-of-an-inch small–they get very interesting. The ordinary rules of physics we’re used to fade back as the oddness of quantum physics looms large. Engineers have taken advantage of this fact by fashioning tiny bits of matter, known as quantum dots, that behave in all sorts of useful ways. For example, quantum dots made from cadmium telluride will respond to ultraviolet light by giving off a flash of visible light–the color depending on their size. If you attach certain molecules to cadmium telluride quantum dots, they will latch onto certain targets, making it possible to detect trace amounts of substances ranging from pesticides to cancer cells.”
“As versatile as cadmium telluride quantum dots are, however, they’re not easy to make. It’s especially tedious to fashion them so that they’re not toxic to living cells, since both cadmium and tellurium are nasty metals. In the latest issue of Nature Nanotechnology, a group of scientists at Kings College London offer a remarkably easy way to make them. In earthworms.”
(Read more: The Quantum Earthworm – Phenomena)

openscience:

Earthworms that shit quantum technology!

“When things get small–like millionths-of-an-inch small–they get very interesting. The ordinary rules of physics we’re used to fade back as the oddness of quantum physics looms large. Engineers have taken advantage of this fact by fashioning tiny bits of matter, known as quantum dots, that behave in all sorts of useful ways. For example, quantum dots made from cadmium telluride will respond to ultraviolet light by giving off a flash of visible light–the color depending on their size. If you attach certain molecules to cadmium telluride quantum dots, they will latch onto certain targets, making it possible to detect trace amounts of substances ranging from pesticides to cancer cells.”

“As versatile as cadmium telluride quantum dots are, however, they’re not easy to make. It’s especially tedious to fashion them so that they’re not toxic to living cells, since both cadmium and tellurium are nasty metals. In the latest issue of Nature Nanotechnology, a group of scientists at Kings College London offer a remarkably easy way to make them. In earthworms.”

(Read more: The Quantum Earthworm – Phenomena)

(via futureofscience)

  1. femmeviva reblogged this from futureofscience
  2. mcktea reblogged this from futureofscience and added:
    I knew worms had a greater purpose!
  3. jonnukem reblogged this from futureofscience and added:
    LMAO! This was amazing!
  4. fantasticeschaton reblogged this from futureofscience
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  6. mucholderthen reblogged this from futureofscience and added:
    What a time to be alive!
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  16. faeles-mysticus reblogged this from futureofscience and added:
    Worms are the shit. (Ha ha. I’m so funny. *Sarcasm*)
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